Editorial

John Sentamu and Canterbury seat

Hush-hush diplomatic shuttles may have begun to scuttle the chances of an African to head the Anglican Communion worldwide as the retiring date of the incumbent, Dr Rowan Williams draws near.

The choice of the African, John Sentamu (Archbishop of York) is hot on the scale.

Horsetrading has indeed begun with the pros and cons pitching their different camps.

According to reports in a British newspaper, The Guardian, Archbishop John Sentamu, a Ugandan, has what it takes to mount the saddle – ambitious courage, a gift for theatre.

“He works hard”, it continues, “he says unpopular things often and popular things as often as he can”.

But the paper, known to sway opinion of its readers and the British public, adds, “it is absurd to pretend that his status as an outsider who came here as an asylum seeker is not central to his  presentation of himself”.

The fear being expressed here stems from past experiences at  which worthy and credible Africans are elbowed out of common causes on the global scene.

The diplomatic stroke suffered by our own Finance Minister, Dr Ngozi Okojo-Iweala at the recent election of a new president of World Bank, comes to mind.

She was a hot choice, even a product of that institution, but fell a victim of diplomatic intrigue, fuelled by foreign media and their homo-sexual allies in their bid to sustain the tempo through headship of vital world establishments.

Although the election of the leader of the Anglican Communion is not an open one like the World Bank case, there are likely to be manouvres set to knuckle down a black man again on the world scale.

The church must divest itself of impolitic promptings that are rampant in the lay society.

Race should not be a factor this time!

 

Hush-hush diplomatic shuttles may have begun to scuttle the chances of an African to head the Anglican Communion worldwide as the retiring date of the incumbent, Dr Rowan Williams draws near.

The choice of the African, John Sentamu (Archbishop of York) is hot on the scale.

Horsetrading has indeed begun with the pros and cons pitching their different camps.

According to reports in a British newspaper, The Guardian, Archbishop John Sentamu, a Ugandan, has what it takes to mount the saddle – ambitious courage, a gift for theatre.

“He works hard”, it continues, “he says unpopular things often and popular things as often as he can”.

But the paper, known to sway opinion of its readers and the British public, adds, “it is absurd to pretend that his status as an outsider who came here as an asylum seeker is not central to his  presentation of himself”.

The fear being expressed here stems from past experiences at  which worthy and credible Africans are elbowed out of common causes on the global scene.

The diplomatic stroke suffered by our own Finance Minister, Dr Ngozi Okojo-Iweala at the recent election of a new president of World Bank, comes to mind.

She was a hot choice, even a product of that institution, but fell a victim of diplomatic intrigue, fuelled by foreign media and their homo-sexual allies in their bid to sustain the tempo through headship of vital world establishments.

Although the election of the leader of the Anglican Communion is not an open one like the World Bank case, there are likely to be manouvres set to knuckle down a black man again on the world scale.

The church must divest itself of impolitic promptings that are rampant in the lay society.

Race should not be a factor this time!

 

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